Tag Archives: England

Scenes on Sunday ~ Durham, England

Durham; half church of God, half castle against the Scot.

The City of Durham was founded in 995 AD, although I guess there were people living there for centuries before the monks arrived to ‘officially’ found Durham City.  Building work on the spectacularly imposing Norman cathedral was begun in 1093 AD, but there was an earlier Anglo-Saxon cathedral on the site for about 100 years before that.

History is always written by the winners.

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

jack collier

jackcollier7@talktalk.net

get a book about Durham

 

 

 

The first picture of the cathedral is a stock photo, the tower was covered in scaffold when I was there.

In medieval times touching the door knocker gave criminals sanctuary.

I used to drink in that pub when I was a younger man. 

springtime colours

~

vernal freshness efflorescence clear bright fresh light

transforms azure to cerulean and scattered enigmatic white

yet the verdant ground throws still skeletal branches coldly black

~

words and pictures by jack collier

jackcollier7@talktalk.net

Scenes on Sunday # 18

This Sunday morning we English moved our clocks back one hour to where they should always stay ~ Greenwich Mean Time.  This means we effectively get an hour of extra daylight in the mornings.  It’s also another sign that winter is almost upon us, the skies are changing, and the North Sea is back to its ill-tempered worst.  The Atlantic is brutal and dangerous, but at this time of year the North Sea is just a grey bitch.

~

p1050199

~

beach2

~

beach

~

P1050015

~

P1040766

~

liebster-12pictures by jack collier

jackcollier7@talktalk.net

Medicinal Plants ~ Rosehips

p1050182

Autumn is upon us, and in England the hedgerows are full wild harvest.  One of these is the false fruit of the dog rose, (rosa canina), more commonly known in England as rose hips.

p1050177You can do a lot of stuff with rose hips, from making syrups and jams, to my preferred use which is to make a tincture of rose hips and rosemary in apple cider vinegar.  As well as sweetening and adding taste to the cider vinegar. the rose hips also add diuretic, lithontriptic, and mild laxative qualities to your brew.  As for rosemary, this stuff is almost a cure-all.  I just add an odd number of fresh sprigs to the bottle, (it must be an odd number.)

The finished product, (ready in about 6 weeks and will keep for a year or more), is a great basis for a salad dressing.  Diluted in water it is also a first class tonic and as part of a whole-body cleanse.  There is no truth whatsoever in the rumour that this is a female aphrodisiac.  However, it is supposed to be a cure for practically whatever that ails you.

You can also make a true tincture of rose hips using medicinal alcohol, (or vodka).  For those of us with a real taste for booze, just make a rose hip brandy or vodka.  I have even heard of rose hip gin, although I’ve never tasted it.

The dog rose is an important plant to the herbalist, because the leaves, petals, and hips all have their uses.  In a hedgerow, the plant may reach six feet or more in height, its flowers can be anything from white to a delicate pink, and if will guard its bounty with some particularly persistent thorns.  (You can also use the hips, leaves, and petals of the cultivated rose, but I would look for a rose variety that’s as close to the wild rose as possible.)

The mixture of rose hips, rosemary, and organic apple cider vinegar is as near to a sorcerer’s brew as anything I know.

~

canina1jackcollier7@talktalk.net

liebster-12

English Independence

trooping-the-colour-t

The writing was on the wall when Britain refused to have anything to do with Europe’s grandiose, fatally flawed scheme to replace the national currencies of its member states with a single pan-European currency, the Euro.

The usual suspects were all in favour of Britain dumping the Pound Sterling, and accepting the new Monopoly Money currency.  Left-Liberal politicians, Europhile officials, and the leaders of big business all warned that Britain was destined for economic failure if we did not adopt the Euro ~ well that was a load of bull droppings.  The Euro has proved a disaster, especially for the smaller, less wealthy countries, Greece, and Ireland being two notable examples.

These same usual suspects are trumpeting the same doom and gloom now that the people of England have voted to leave a club we didn’t even know we were joining.  If you lived here you would be heartily sick of the amount of air-time the pro EU BBC are giving to the vapid talking heads.

Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind.  ~  Rudyard Kipling

The European Union was sold to the English as a free trade zone, not as an attempt to replace the sovereign nations of Europe with a sort of United States of Europe, with a single European Government, mostly made up of unelected technocrats.  This was just a small part of the internationalists goal of a one-world government.  Not only that, the corrupt European Union receives, net,  billions of £ from England, every single damn year.  Some of that money comes back to the United Kingdom disguised as EU largesse.

And that is called paying the Dane-geld; but we’ve proved it again and again, that if once you have paid him the Dane-geld you never get rid of the Dane.  ~  Rudyard Kipling

There are some immediate downsides to the English electorate’s decision to walk away from the European Union;

  1. Total chaos in the United Kingdom’s political system. (We English despise all politicians, with the exception of Churchill, and possibly Thatcher.)
  2. Total chaos in the financial markets, especially the City of London.  (So what, some City cowboys are just using Brexit to make money.)
  3. A down-grading of Britain’s credit rating from AAA+ to AA.  (Good, we borrow too much anyhow.)
  4. A resurgence of the loony Left-Liberals, all of whom are saying that the electorate was wrong, stupid, ill-informed, and we want another referendum, preferably one we can rig.  (Have you seen the joke they call Jeremy Corbin?)
  5. New calls for Independence in Scotland, Northern Ireland, and Wales, and by the way these countries don’t want to leave the EU.  (Good, these countries are a drain on England’s prosperity, and they all hate the English.)

You want to know what the ‘man on the Clapham Omnibus’ thinks about those downsides ~ the average Englishman doesn’t give a damn.  We do not like being told what to do by a bunch of Johnny Foreigners, we don’t like uncontrolled immigration, we really don’t like politicians, unelected officials, the leaders of big business, and pseudo intellectual professors who would like England to be a communist country.  As always England will prevail in the end.

If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew to serve your turn long after they are gone, and so hold on when there is nothing in you except the will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’  ~  Rudyard Kipling.

After the immediate chaos, the politicians had better negotiate an EU exit deal which is satisfactory to the average Englishman.  If they don’t, if they try to sell the same old stinking fish in new wrappings, the chaos you see now will be as nothing to the upheaval to come.  Politicians need to remember that the ballot box is a two-edged sword, and sometimes it cuts off the heads of the complacent.

Historically, England has always looked to the sea.  Every single time England has become involved in the politics of Europe it has cost us dear.

Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves, that if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, This was their finest hour.  ~  Churchill

My American friends also have reasons to be worried.  As you are about to celebrate your Independence Day, the independence of the U.S.A. is under increasing attack by the United Nations, ably assisted by your incumbent President and staunch UN proponent, Mr Barak Obama.

~

P1040484jackcollier7@talktalk.net

liebster-12

 

 

sea sand patterns

P1040534

~

the life of man is like patterns in the sand

sometimes impressive and over grand

soon to be washed away by time and

the flowing searching tide

~

DSCF0037Words and pictures by Jack Collier

jackcollier7@talktalk.net

liebster-12

Global Warming, don’t worry about it.

P1020441

Amidst the latest brouhaha and persecution of ‘climate change deniers’ there’s one good reason I can’t get at all excited about catastrophic anthropogenic climate change, (man-made global warming), and ‘green energy’.  The fact is that the Northern Hemisphere is still in the last hurrah of the last ice age.

Some 10,500 years ago, (the blink of an eye in cosmic and geological time), most of the people on Earth lived in Africa because everywhere else was too damn cold.  In fact, the last ice age hasn’t yet really ended, so any time in the next few hundred or few thousand years Europe, North America, and Northern Asia could be again covered by sheets of ice miles thick.

Much of the geology of these continents was structured by ice ~the Great Lakes in North America were formed 20,000 years ago as a result of the last period of glaciation.  Where I live now was covered by a sheet of ice three miles thick only 10,000 years ago ~ and the ice reached as far south in England as where London is now.  As I said 10,000 years is but the blink of an eye in terms of geology and the life-cycle of our sun and the planets.

Agriculture has only existed in England for 6,000 years, because before that it was too cold, so Mesolithic Man lived by hunting.  Up until 6,200 years ago, so much of the seas’ waters were locked up in ice on the land that you could walk from what is now Germany to England, without getting your feet wet ~ over a stretch of dry land called Doggerland.  Where the English Channel is now used to be part of what is now called the River Rhine.

Ice Ages have come and gone over the last 2.4 billion years, starting with Snowball Earth and the Lower Huronian Ice Age.  It is thought that Ice Ages are caused by changes in the Earth’s orbit and the amount by which our planet tilts.  Typically, a period of extreme glaciation could happen about every 100,000 years or so, (but can last for up to 200 or 300 million years.)  The last one has only being running, (on and off), for around 100 million years.  The Earth is now in an interglacial period, so we have a lot more worries over freezing to death than we have over global warming.

May I suggest that you don’t worry too much about global warming, but make certain you know how to cope with a hell of a lot of snow and ice.

Moon_Nightjackcollier7@talktalk.net

liebster-12

the lonely sea and the sky

 

P1030943

~

I am 5,975 miles away

~

I pray for my love every day

words cannot convey what I need to say

~

yet she is often very busy

ballet of shared silence, dismal dismay

building love’s long rise from lonely decay

~

P1030482words and pictures by jack collier

jackcollier7@talktalk.net

Old Ladies in SoCal

Mature Englishmen are very sentimental creatures.  We like older things.  We call inanimate objects She, devote endless time and money toward their well-being, and pat their flanks affectionately when no one is looking.  That doesn’t ever stop us wanting to play with someone else’s boat, aeroplane, lathe, workshop, or car.  I love this Buick.

P1040167

We don’t get Buicks in England, anyhow a car this big would not fit on an average European road ~ think small and twisty.

P1040171

I have no idea what this cool sports car is ~ although the girl riding shotgun told me it was a Ford Thunderbird.

P1040170

Because of our cold, damp, salty air in England, an older classic needs to be looked after every second of every day.  Left outdoors in England, this early GMC would have turned into a pile of scrap by now.

P1040172

In England, rust is the bugbear for unprotected and untreated metal.  This Lincoln Continental was completely rust free.

P1040173

It’s amazing to me how inexpensive some of these cars are.

P1040175

A classic in England costs a lot more than you would think, to buy, run, and maintain.  Although I’m not certain I would drive a purple, (cerise), car, this one is certainly eye-catching.  We don’t see the Cadillac XLR coupe in England so often.

Camperpictures by jack collier

jackcollier7@talktalk.net

Sunrise, Sunset

From the sun rising in England, to the sun setting in California.

Solstice

~

P1030477

~

P1030445

When you are in love, even the sunset is better.

puppy-catjackcollier7@talktalk.net

%d bloggers like this: