Aztec Wisdom and Lost Luggage

Do the best to treat yourself with truth and loving care.

Red Rock Country, Arizona

On my very recent rip to Arizona I was fortunate enough to be taught some of the wisdom of the ancient Aztecs.  These new-found insights into dealing with the more difficult parts of life came in useful ~ when I eventually got back to the North of England, after some 30 hours travelling from the Western USA.

After an interminable delay at Heathrow, I manged to arrive  late at Newcastle upon Tyne Airport ~ I got home, but my luggage didn’t.  I did not take my missing luggage personally, British Airways had loaded none of the passengers’ bags onto that flight.  Something the pilot only told us just as we about to deplane at Newcastle.  You can imagine the scene at the baggage agent’s desk in arrivals, with more than 100 people completing forms, crying, and complaining bitterly about their ‘lost’ luggage.  It was chaos.

I remembered some of the teachings of the ancient Aztecs;

  • Be open, honest, and honorable to yourself and others.  In all honesty, it didn’t much matter to me that my luggage hadn’t arrived.  That just meant that I wasn’t going to be starting my laundry as soon as I got back to the garret.  I was also honest with myself, and accepted that all the crying, complaining, and shouting passengers at the baggage handling desk annoyed the hell out of me.
  • Don’t ever take anything personally.  I wasn’t singled out by fate or British Airways to suffer the inconvenience of missing bags.  There were more than 100 people on that flight, and all anyone had was their carryon bag.
  • Don’t make assumptions.  I’m not assuming that my luggage will eventually arrive, or not.  What will be will be, and there’s fuck bugger all I can do about it.
  • Always do your very best.  Yesterday, and the day before were not my best days, but somedays my best isn’t as good as 100%, and somedays my best is maybe just 50%.  However, if I always do the very best I can in the circumstances, then that’s the best I can do.

These teachings applied to the trivial matter of a horrible 30 hour journey and missing luggage.  However, these teachings of the Aztecs apply even more to matters of much more import in one’s life.  For example; Love, Relationships, Illness, Poverty, and Abundance…..

Some say that Life is a version of Hell.  And that if you think someone is out to get you then they probably are.  All I know is that the Cosmos doesn’t really single me out for misery and misfortune ~ even in matters of missing luggage.

~

jack collier

jackcollier7@talktalk.net

5 responses

  1. I have had one misplaced bag in all my travels. The only one that stayed with me was the one I’d packed my dirty clothes in! Completely annoyed me, but the rest eventually arrived. At least I didn’t have any fish in it!
    How is Marmaduke??? I keep a quote near me to help me in this mess. ‘No matter what gets done and how much is left undone. I am enough.’ B. Brown. It is better than ‘Que, sera, sera’. (but I still adore Doris Day!)

    Like

  2. I like that not assuming the luggage will eventually arrive. Aztecs were smart.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Nothing positive I can do but wait. 😎

      Like

  3. It’s good to have you back, Mr Collier. Good to see you brought back some of my essence with you. People do tend to focus on all the negative though, so it’s nice when mayan good stuff is brought to the forefront.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks ❤
      It's strange to be back at home. Nothing has changed but me, and yet everything seems completely different. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

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